Acting Silly

“Today was good.  Today was fun.  Tomorrow is another one.”  Dr. Seuss

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Heart-a-Day #15: Dr. Seuss’ Heart

I’ve already shared that flamingos are the symbol of Room 12. Have I told you that Freddy Flamingo is our class mascot? Each Wacky Wednesday, there’s mail from Freddy in our flamingo-shaped mailbox. Frida Flamingo, Freddy’s cousin (AKA the puppet on my hand), takes great pleasure in reading Freddy’s weekly rhyming message. Afterwards, we go back and find the rhyming words, snapping our fingers each time we hear a rhyme. Why? Rhyming words are cool! Silly? You betcha!

So, let’s talk seriously about silliness. Dr. Suess is my all-time inspiration for both rhyming and silliness. Being silly in the classroom keeps things light and bright (oops, that just slipped out). My students have memorized all my goofy sayings and like to repeat them back to me. I love hearing them tell me I’m being a silly-willy. One way I teach phonemic awareness is by using silly rhymes. Since each table group has a name, like the Green Elephant Table, I’ll tell the Reen Gelephant Fable to line up for lunch. Instead of asking the class to stand up on the floor, we band cup on the door. When the students correct my silly wordplay, I know they’re listening for beginning sounds in words. A little silliness goes a long way in your students’ learning. Seriously.

When was the last time you were silly with your students? Do you play with rhymes? Is there a silly song or poem your students can use to transition from one activity to another? Let yourself be silly and help the students join in. You’ll be proud and happy with your big win. I just can’t stop.
 

(Access to these photographs does not constitute a transfer of copyright or a license for commercial use.  The images are for personal use only.  No portion of the images can be used without the expressed written permission of Michael B. Stanley, Jr.)

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heartwork62

I am an artist, musician, author and kindergarten teacher wanting to share what I have learned about teaching and making art.

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